204-“Marshal of Sweetwater”

Directed by Jerry Hopper, Written by Gene Roddenberry.

KATHIE BROWNE as Marie Ellis
DAVID WHITE as Marshal Tom Carey
GORDON JONES as Harry Brawley
PAUL BIRCH as Jenkins
BOOTH COLMAN as Mort Tyler
JOHN DAMLER as Storekeeper
JOHN MATTHEWS as Farmer
HOWARD HOFFMAN as Stagecoach Driver

John Barton as Townsman (uncredited)
Nick Borgani as Bartender (uncredited)
John Breen as Townsman (uncredited)
Russell Custer as Townsman (uncredited)
Herman Hack as Townsman (uncredited)
Ethan Laidlaw as Barfly (uncredited)
Bert Madrid as Barfly (uncredited)
Hans Moebus as Townsman (uncredited)
William H. O’Brien as Townsman (uncredited)
Paul Power as Townsman (uncredited)
Fred Rapport as Townsman (uncredited)
Cosmo Sardo as Townsman (uncredited)
Norman Stevans as Townsman (uncredited)

KATHIE BROWNE also appeared in: (Taylor’s Woman, 1962) as Lydia Moss.

DAVID WHITE also appeared in: (Everyman, 1961) as Cus Mincus,
(The Golden Toad, 1959) as Webster, (Unforgiven, 1959) as General Crommer.

PAUL BIRCH also appeared in: (The Chase, 1959) as Sheriff Scanlon,
(The Hanging of Roy Carter, 1958) as Warden Bullock

JOHN DAMLER also appeared in: (Trial at Tablerock, 1962) as Bartender.

EXT. TOWN OF SWEETWATER – DAY

DRIVER
Whoa!

FRANK
Morning, Mr. Tyler, and Mr. Jenkins.

MR. JENKINS
Frank.

MORT TYLER
Over here, please. Name, please?

MARIE ELLIS
Marie Ellis.

JENKINS
You may not like it here, miss. Sweetwater’s a family town, if you get what I mean.

MORT TYLER
You better tell me something about yourself. Our marshal’s mighty particular about what new folks’ business is.

PALADIN
Well, gentlemen, I think your marshal will be a good deal more interested
in my business.

PALADIN
I waited a long time to meet him again. I’ll be out in the street when he’s ready.

MORT TYLER
You must be out of your head. Marshal here is Tom Carey.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
You always was a mite too sure of yourself, Paladin.
Still a split eyelash faster. Always was, always will be.
You know, I was beginning to think you… you was dead.

PALADIN
Well, I wondered the same about you.
Army let the scouts go, you just dropped out of sight.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Well, the buffalo all gone, the Plains tribes breaking up,
just didn’t seem to be no place for me.

PALADIN
Hm. Well, Tom, the newspapers made a big show out of your return.
“Legend from the past offers to clean up Sweetwater,” they said.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
They thought I was too old. Well, I showed ’em. Tyler! Bustle on over here.

TOWNSMAN
That’s a fine piece of shooting, Marshal. So fast, I couldn’t see your hand move.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Pass the word…Mr. Paladin will be my guest, long as he cares to stay here.

MORT TYLER
Yes, sir, Mr. Carey. We’ll see that he’s treated right.
That’s the female who got off the same stage.

PALADIN
Tom, that is Marie Ellis. I understand she bought the Gold Lily Saloon from a man in Abilene.

MORT TYLER
Bill Houghton didn’t tell you he was gonna sell his place to a woman.
No wonder he didn’t come back.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
I’ll look in on her later. Got to be careful things don’t slide back like they was before I came here. Come on. I’ll show you a town that’s run like a town ought to be run.

INT. MARSHAL’S OFFICE – DAY

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
The only sickness your boy’s got is plain laziness. I’ll expect to see him in school tomorrow. See how it works? A boy dodging school could lead to all sorts of things.
My system is to fix problems ‘fore they start.

PALADIN
Tom, you don’t think it was the mother’s province to say whether or not the boy was sick?

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
You don’t understand. I only step in when folks decide wrong.
Now, you take Harry Brawley there. He’s got more grazing land than he can use, but no…never occurs to him to help out his neighbor.

HARRY BRAWLEY
I got plans for that land. It ain’t your job to mess in my private affairs.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
It’s a marshal’s job to stop trouble, ain’t it? You give Joe Elkins any trouble when he starts fencing tomorrow, and I’ll do my job. Him and his missus are giving me more bother
than any ten families. It’s funny…me, who never lived in a town in his life before, and the minute I walked in, I could see what was missing. Like skinning a buffalo…there’s a right way and a wrong way. Folks just need someone to show ’em the right way.

Shopkeeper comes in.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Yes, sir. Trouble can start even in little things. Like overcharging three cents on a pound of flour.

SHOPKEEPER
Oh, Mr. Carey’s always fair. Uh…Life’s a lot simpler since he came.

PALADIN
Well, Tom, it’s hardly a new system. Now, aside from the fact that the law is very clear and specific as to what a lawman can and cannot do…

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Mr. Paladin’s a great reader of books. Give him half a chance and, well, he can go on for hours with all the, uh…fancy ideas he’s come across.

PALADIN
Well, Tom…I’ve had a long, hard day. I’ll check into my hotel, and maybe we can talk later. Excuse me.

INT. SWEETWATER SALOON – DAY

MARIE ELLIS
You can tell Marshal Carey…The bar is open, gentlemen.
The first drink is courtesy of the new management.
I’m sorry, ma’am, Mr. Carey doesn’t allow any drinks to be sold until 7:00.
Then only three to a customer.

MARIE ELLIS
I can’t make a living that way. It won’t even pay expenses!

TOWNSMAN
That’s why Houghton sold you the place so cheap.

PALADIN
Bartender, I’d like a brandy, if you have it.

Marie bolts down her drink.

PALADIN
Ooh, Marie…Brandy’s made to be sipped slowly.
Enjoy it. Try to cure your troubles with it.

MARIE ELLIS
Have you known him for a long time?

PALADIN
Mm-hmm. When I was a young cavalry lieutenant, my first command, he was our scout.
I guess he was just about the best friend I ever had.

MARIE ELLIS
Is he really faster than you?

PALADIN
He says so.

MARIE ELLIS
Well, men change, Paladin, and when they do, it can be awful dangerous if your feelings about them don’t change, too. Take it from someone who found that out the hard way.

HARRY BRAWLEY
Well, look at all the yellow-bellies, just waiting around
for permission to breathe! Hah! Harry Brawley makes up his own mind, honey.
I’ve already had one; you could just serve me up another.

MARIE ELLIS
Bring the man a bottle. Maybe what he’s got’ll be catching. Now, that is the bottle there, friend; I’m the management.

TOWNSMAN
You can set me up, too. Maybe it’s high time some folks around here started to…

HARRY BRAWLEY
The lady’ll obey any proper voted laws, Carey.
Anything else, she figures, is just one man’s opinion.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Well…being as I got an old friend in town tonight, Mr. Tyler…I reckon it’s close enough to
7:00 for folks to have a drink.

MARIE ELLIS
Let’s have another bottle down here, Nick.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Sort of slithers…like a mountain cat when she moves.
Wild-like. That’s the kind that makes the most trouble.

PALADIN
Tom, I didn’t realize you were such an expert in the field.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Well, a man don’t have to be a swimmer to recognize a poison water hole.
Now, listen…you didn’t see what it was when I came here.
Brawley, who was so worried about a few acres of grazing,

he couldn’t raise cattle as fast as they was being stole.
The bank was closed. Murphy, the storekeeper, had both his boys shot down in the street.
And the one thing that changed all that was a set of rules folks could depend on.

PALADIN
Your rules.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Now, look around you, man…no loafin’, no thievin’. Well, ain’t that better than folks getting themselves all mixed up with their own ideas?

PALADIN
I’d like to think you’re joking.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
The two things that made all the trouble here before was that. And that.

MARIE ELLIS
And another one down here.
Well, how about it!

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
When I wrecked Houghton’s business here, I…I thought I was finally rid of both of them. Now they’re both back.

PALADIN
Tom…you sure that’s why you can’t keep your eyes off her?

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
I’m trying to do my job. I saw the kind of woman she was the minute I saw her walk down the street.

PALADIN
Tom, this is an area about which you know absolutely nothing.
Now, if you try and master it at your age, you’re gonna make a fool of yourself.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Well…let’s just see how much
I do know about it, hmm?

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
I’d like a word with the lady, gentlemen.
Just struck me, ma’am, you didn’t say where you came from.

MARIE ELLIS
Abilene.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Oh. Well, lots of us here know Abilene real well. What part of town?
Out of town a bit. Sort of the edge of town?

PALADIN
All right, Tom, that’s enough.

PALADIN
You don’t have to answer any more questions.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
I’d hate to have words with an old friend.

MARIE ELLIS
Keep out of it, please, Mr. Paladin. I’ll have to handle it myself, sooner or later.
Now, I want to make something clear, right here and now.
I scraped and I saved till I had me $1,200.
And there isn’t a one here who’ll ever know what it cost me to get it.
I spent 12 cents on a bar of lye soap, and I scrubbed till my skin was raw…
then $20 for a new dress…and the rest I gave to a man to buy this place here.
A saloon, because I’d had a lot of time to see how they was run,
and I figured I could run me one, too…and be a lady at the same time.

PALADIN
All right, that’s enough. You don’t have to tell him anything more.
If he doesn’t understand now, he never will.

MARIE ELLIS
Do you understand? I would rather die than go back to where I started.
You see…I’m betting my life…that I can run a decent business and still be the kind of woman…

HARRY BRAWLEY
Listen to Paladin, lady. You stood up to him better than any man here.
Don’t spoil it by begging him.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
As usual, Mr. Brawley’s out of step with everybody.

PALADIN
Not everybody, Tom. Now, I don’t want you to bother her again.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
You’re asking me, of course.

PALADIN
I’ll start with that. I’m asking you not to bother this girl again.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
And if asking me to turn from what I figure is right…costs us about the last drop
of friendship we got?

PALADIN
That’s a stiff price. But if you force me to it, I’ll pay it.

MARIE ELLIS
I’m sorry.

HARRY BRAWLEY
I’m gonna bring my missus down tomorrow to meet you, Miss Ellis.
She’ll like you a lot, or she ain’t the kind of woman I think I married.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
From what I’ve seen in Mrs. Brawley, they have a lot in common. Real common.

Carey shoots down Brawley.

INT. SALOON – NIGHT

TOWNSMAN
Ain’t enough to make him un-pin his badge. He ought to be hung.

MORT TYLER
Plenty of us would have tried to stop him, but it all happened so gradual.

PALADIN
You knew, mister. Every one of you knew. First thing you gave up was a piece of your backbone. You didn’t feel it, you should’ve known something was wrong when you tried to walk, and all you could do was crawl. Now, at the risk of being trampled to death in the brave rush to sign, who do I offer this thing to first?

JENKINS
Go ahead and sign it, Mort. I’ll sign after you.

EXT. MAIN STREET

Cary walks across the street and knocks on the door of the saloon.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Miss Ellis? It’s Tom Carey.

MORT TYLER
Ed and I’ll get the rest of the signatures tomorrow.

The townspeople quietly leave out the back way. Miss Ellis turns out the lamp.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Miss Ellis?

MARIE ELLIS
I… I’m sorry, but I’ve turned in for the night.

Paladin removes her dress and hides behind the door.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
I want to talk to you.

Marie opens the door.

I, uh…I been thinking that, uh…maybe it could be that…I… well, ain’t been exactly fair.
Maybe if we could kind of talk about it?

MARIE ELLIS
Well, I-I’d be happy to talk about it tomorrow.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
You’re mighty pretty, ma’am. Too pretty to be bad, I mean. I tried sleeping, but…I kept tossing…and tossing and thinking how…how all young animals is pretty wild.
Well, th-that’s their way. And how they sort of…need someone to guide them.
All you need is a little help. And I think…Well…maybe I ain’t had the…practice at this fancy talk like some, but…maybe I seem a little old…but please…

MARIE ELLIS
I-I’m just not interested. Can’t you understand that?

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Well, you said yourself that…everything you got is staked on your one chance here.
Now, suppose that…instead of going it alone…there was… you…and me, sort of together.
Understand? Well, you said you always wanted to be a lady.
Well, folks in this town will do anything I tell them. Now… now, suppose I…I figure out that there wasn’t anything…anything that was t…too good for you, and…

Carey pushes the door open and discovers Paladin who faces him down and gives him his usual hard look. Carey turns and leaves quietly.

MARIE ELLIS
He won’t let you leave. Not now. Not alive. Don’t you know that?

PALADIN
We’ll leave in the morning. And I’ll take you over to the county seat till this is over.

EXT. MAIN STREET – MORNING

MORT TYLER
We got eight more signatures. Are you sure that’ll be enough?

PALADIN
Where’s Miss Ellis? I thought you were bringing her baggage.

JENKINS
The marshal’s in there with her. You wouldn’t believe it if you didn’t see it.
He’s laughing and having himself a drink or two.

PALADIN
Driver. Be two of us going out; you mind waiting?

DRIVER
Ain’t no rush. Marshal says this stage don’t leave till he gives the word.

MORT TYLER
Um, we’ll get you a horse. You can get away while she’s got him busy in there.

PALADIN
Miss Ellis…the stage is waiting.

MARIE ELLIS
Well, I changed my mind. You just run on alone. Now, you said he could go.
We made an agreement. Well, will you please leave here?
We don’t want you around.

PALADIN
That’s a very nice try, Miss Ellis, but it’s a bad gamble.

MARIE ELLIS
I don’t know what he’s talking about.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
Then I reckon you won’t mind if I kill him. After all, he has it coming…turning against me like he did, laughing at me when I came calling last night.

MARSHAL TOM CAREY
I always let you draw first. Whenever you’re ready, Paladin.
Paladin! Paladin…one more step and I’ll kill you!

MARIE ELLIS
You old fool! Can’t you see he’s trying to save your life?
Why do you think I was hugging and kissing you?
Did you really think I wanted to hold a stupid old man like you?!

Carey tries to draw his gun but Paladin shoots him.

PALADIN
Tom…

Paladin shoots Carey down.

MARIE ELLIS
I never killed a man before.

PALADIN
Mm-mm. I could always beat him. I let him think he was faster because it pleased him.
You can go ahead, driver. Miss Ellis won’t be leaving after all, and I’ll be staying on to make some arrangements for an old friend of mine.

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